Ultrascope Doppler Stethoscope

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The Ultrascope Doppler stethoscope is a hand-held, 9V battery operated ultrasonic Doppler that has been used in human and animal applications for over 30 years although the Ultrascope is no longer sold for human applications. Models are available for fetal and blood flow detection in small animals. The Doppler model selected depends on the size and depth of the target under investigation. Larger animals may require the fetal detector to pick up fetal heart sounds, where these sounds may be heard in smaller mammals and invertebrates using a blood flow detector. See below for common applications or contact Vmed to discuss your intended use.

The Ultrascope is as easy to use as a stethoscope, but superior do to the relatively small sensor tip (can be as small as 1/4″ in diameter depending on the model selected). Doppler ultrasound has many applications in veterinary and human medicine. See “Clinical Papers” on this site for veterinary applications. Apply Ultrasound gel, KY jelly, water or alcohol must to the area of investigation and clip thick hair to allow ultrasound energy to pass through the skin. The pressure applied to the skin, the angle of the probe and the Doppler frequency effect the sensitivity and signal quality. 

 

iguana-ultrascopetsnake-webfrogThree frequencies are available, each optimized for the best signal in various applications. Quite a bit of overlap exists in frequency sensitivity to various targets depending on the size of the patient:

Model 8 (8 MHz.): Peripheral vascular and cardio-vascular applications in mammals, reptiles, rodents and birds. The Model 8 may be used to measure systolic blood pressure when used in conjunction with a cuff and sphygmomanometer but requires one hand to hold the probe, another to steady the limb and an assistant to pump up the gauge. Blood pressure measurements are much easier to take using the Vet-Dop since only one person is required.

Model 5 (5 MHz.): Used where sensitivity to the deeper vessels such as the femoral and abdominal arteries is needed. Most dog and cat heart, early gestation fetal and deep vessel blood flow signals on larger mammals.

Model 2 (2.25 MHz.): Advanced gestation fetal sounds and best heart sounds on larger mammals.

Clip hair and use ample coupling gel for the best Doppler signal.  Some vets report  that an adequate signal may be obtained  through hair if the limb is soaked in alcohol or water first.  Amphibians may not require coupling gel if the skin is moist. The Doppler Stethoscope in Veterinary Medicine

“Doppler ultrasound echocardiological examination is a useful means for evaluating the cardiovascular function in even the smallest reptiles and many, if not most, postmetamorphosed amphibians. The technique permits the resolution of the discrete sounds produced by atrial and ventricular myo0cardial contraction, atrioventricular and aortic valvular blood flow, intravenal caval filling and aortic ejection, and often the flow of blood within smaller individual arteries and veins. The Doppler ultrasonic flow detector offers a relatively new, noninvasive, moderately priced, highly sensitive accurate and cost-effective alternative means for clinically evaluating intracardiac and intrvascular sounds even in very small patients.” Ultrasonic Doppler Blood Flow Detection in Small Exotic Animal Medicine. Seminars in Avian and Exotic Pet Medicine, Vol. 3, No. 3, (July, 1994): pp 133-139 (800) 926-9622. Fredric L. Frye, BSc, DVM, MSc, CBiol, FiBiol

  • Benefits and Uses
  • Super-sensitive ultrasound
  • Light weight pocket Doppler design
  • Stethoscope Headphones for best sound quality.
  •  Detect fetal heart sounds
  • Confirm arterial and venous blood flow
  • Evaluate discrete cardiac sounds

Ultrasonic Doppler Blood Flow Detection in Small Exotic Animal Medicine (1)

Doppler ultrasonic echocardiological examination is a useful means for evaluating the cardiovascular function in even the smallest reptiles and many, if not most, postmetamorphosed amphibians. This technique permits the resolution of the discrete sounds produced by atrial and ventricular myocardial contraction, atrioventricular myocardial contraction, atrioventricular and aortic valvular blood flow, intravenal caval filling and aortic ejection, and often the flow of blood within smaller individual arteries and veins. All of these sounds can be detected without the need for invasive procedures and, thus, pose no inherent risk to the patient. Other uses for the Doppler ultrasonic detector includes the evaluation and monitoring of intraoviductal embryos of fetuses or ovoviviparous reptiles and the viability and embryonic development of incubating reptilian eggs well beyond the time when conventional candling fails to yield satisfactory results. 

(1) Fredric L. Frye, BSc, DVM, MSc, CBio, FIBiol, Seminars in Avian and Exotic Pet Medicine, Vol.3, No.3 (July), 1994: pp 133-139